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Natasha Senjanovic / WPLN

Nashville Chat Group For South Asian Docs Becomes A National Network For Domestic Abuse Victims

Two years ago, Nashville pediatrician Vidya Bansal started a Facebook group for women like herself — specifically, doctors of South Asian heritage, living in North America, who were also mothers. The Desi Physician Moms group was a space to share the frustrations and joys of work, family and travel. But slowly, stories of domestic violence also began to surface.

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Nashville Mayor's Office

A new survey of Nashvillians will provide fodder for a series of town-hall meetings that begin Thursday at Maplewood High School.

Mayor David Briley is bringing together residents with elected officials and department heads for six events in the next month (full list and RSVP here).

Natasha Senjanovic / WPLN

Two years ago, Nashville pediatrician Vidya Bansal started a Facebook group for women like herself — specifically, doctors of South Asian heritage, living in North America, who were also mothers. The Desi Physician Moms group was a space to share the frustrations and joys of work, family and travel. But slowly, stories of domestic violence also began to surface.

TN Photo Services

Tennessee education officials got a grilling Wednesday from state lawmakers about the suspected cyberattack that shut down standardized testing earlier this week.

But officials say they're not sure who would have tried to hack the TNReady tests — or why.

courtesy MNPS

Metro Schools superintendent Shawn Joseph was asked to defend his decision to cut the reading recovery program during his public budget hearing Wednesday with Mayor David Briley. The literacy initiative costs more than $7 million a year, employing 83 reading specialists to work with small groups of struggling readers.

#16: What Is Love?

Apr 18, 2018
Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

Without a doubt, romantic love is a driving force in our culture — with countless movies, songs and books devoted to finding it, losing it or making it last. Falling in (or out of) love can feel so intense in our own lives, but our fundamental assumptions about what love really is are not always correct.

In this episode of Movers & Thinkers, we talk to three guests who have seen a lot of love, heartbreak and romantic confusion: relationship therapist Jeannie Ingram, divorce attorney Siew-Ling Shea, and Alex Pollack, a writer who muses on modern dating culture.

Lauren Bishop / CDC

A nonpartisan analysis finds that the federal government is shouldering a much larger share of individual health insurance costs in Tennessee. Subsidies for those who buy their own insurance on the federal marketplace have increased by 309 percent since 2014, according to the Sycamore Institute. Premiums, by comparison, have risen 185 percent over the same period.

One of the most important — and complex — pieces of Nashville’s mass transit proposal is its funding strategy. There’s been significant focus on proposed increases to four local taxes, which would partly fund the projects. Yet those taxes are only a portion of the plan.

So how, in total, would the transit overhaul be funded? And if the financing projections are off target, how would Metro adjust?

Ron Cogswell / via Flickr

The city of Memphis could lose a quarter-million dollars as punishment for removing statues of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest and Confederate President Jefferson Davis last year.

The Tennessee House of Representatives voted Tuesday to strip the money from next year's state budget. The sum had been earmarked to go toward planning for Memphis' bicentennial celebrations next year.

Alberto G. / via Flickr

Another round of problems with the state's standardized tests has Tennessee lawmakers considering ditching computers and going back to pencils and paper.

The proposal is one of several on the table as leaders grapple with an apparent cyberattack on the TNReady testing system.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

Backers of Nashville's $5.4 billion transit plan argue that construction of light rail and expansion of bus service could be good for the city's health. That's because riding typically means much more walking.

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The Promise: Life, Death and Change in the Projects

This WPLN special series podcast explores life in public housing, in the middle of a city on the rise.

The Latest from Classical 91.1

Kara McLeland / Nashville Public Radio

Flutist Bart Feller is used to traveling the country with his instrument. While his main gigs are playing principal flute with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra and teaching at Rutgers University, he spends summers in the desert playing with the Santa Fe Opera Orchestra and weekends teaching the pre college division at Julliard. 

Kara McLeland / Nashville Public Radio

Composer Nicholas Wing gave the world premiere of three works on this week's program, including a piece performed with a violin once played by Bronisław Huberman, founder of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra (then known as the Palestine Philharmonic). 

Kara McLeland / Nashville Public Radio

When the idea of performing all of Ludwig van Beethoven's piano sonatas came to Matthew Phelps, Music Minister at West End United Methodist Church, he thought no one would take it seriously. Soon, however, Phelps had a roster of over 20 professional pianists—many of whom are professors at Belmont, Vanderbilt and Lipscomb— lined up to play the entire sonata cycle. 

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