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Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory

How A Tennessee Supercomputer, Now The World's Fastest, Might Find New Cures For Cancer

A massive room in East Tennessee is now home to the fastest supercomputer in the world. Oak Ridge National Laboratory officially unveiled the machine called Summit late last week, which takes up the size of two tennis courts.

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Blake Farmer / WPLN

The Nashville Hospital Authority gave their CEO a favorable performance review Monday night — while apologizing for it being his first evaluation since being hired in 2015. The board also decided to keep him on for three more years, and to give him raises, though not starting until next year, citing the city's current budget crunch.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

A nursing home chain with more than two dozen facilities in Tennessee has settled a $230 million Medicare fraud case. 

The government's investigation launched in 2014 when two whistleblowers started collecting evidence on their own.

Brian Todd / Metro Public Health

Nashville's newest display of public art could easily be overlooked: an antique crib and highchair, littered with baby bottles. It's in the lobby of the Lentz Public Health Center, and the artwork speaks to the ways racism has harmed public health.

Diane Black for Governor via YouTube

President Donald Trump won't be on the ballot this fall, but he looms large over the races for Congress and governor.

Candidates can boost themselves with conservatives by standing close to Trump — sometimes literally. But no leader in recent history has been as polarizing as the president, so they risk alienating voters elsewhere on the political spectrum.

Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory

A massive room in East Tennessee is now home to the fastest supercomputer in the world. Oak Ridge National Laboratory officially unveiled the machine called Summit late last week, which takes up the size of two tennis courts.

courtesy Pexels

Tennessee doctors are getting a crash course in the state's new restrictions on opioids ahead of the law taking effect July 1. Physicians are concerned about new liability since the prescribing rules do away with much of their discretion.

Every human is fortunate enough to have this organ inside our skull called the brain. It allows us to breathe, create art, develop new technology — and yet, it's still largely a mystery how these masses of neurons translate into thought.

Kara McLeland / Nashville Public Radio

While the Nashville Symphony is just wrapping up the second year of its Accelerando program, they are already looking forward to its long-term results. Meant to foster the talent of young musicians from underrepresented ethnicities, the initiative works to prepare students for careers in the classical field with private lessons from Nashville Symphony players, among other perks.

Walter Bitner, the Symphony's Director of Education and Community Engagement, hopes that in the decades to come, Accelerando will help orchestras "begin to look more like their communities." Representing Accelerando for Live in Studio C was 16-year-old violist Emily Martinez-Perez and 17-year-old flutist Aalia Hanif, and audiences can hear a concert from all of the Accelerando students at the Schermerhorn on June 11

Jay Shah / WPLN

Fans won't be able to walk past the stage to take photos at this year's CMA Music Festival. Heightened security measures will keep fans at a distance from the performers.

Other security measures limit the size of the bags allowed onto the grounds and require that bags be see-through, and concertgoers might also see more checkpoints than in previous years.

Keturah Davis / Courtesy of Joshua Bishop

In 1964, a Japanese country singer named Tomi Fujiyama performed on the Grand Ole Opry, right after Johnny Cash. She had no idea that someday there would be a movie about her life and her quest to get back on the Opry stage — or how long it would take to get there.

This weekend, Fujiyama is back in Nashville to celebrate the official release of that film.

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The Promise: Life, Death and Change in the Projects

This WPLN special series podcast explores life in public housing, in the middle of a city on the rise.

The Latest from Classical 91.1

Kara McLeland / Nashville Public Radio

While the Nashville Symphony is just wrapping up the second year of its Accelerando program, they are already looking forward to its long-term results. Meant to foster the talent of young musicians from underrepresented ethnicities, the initiative works to prepare students for careers in the classical field with private lessons from Nashville Symphony players, among other perks.

Walter Bitner, the Symphony's Director of Education and Community Engagement, hopes that in the decades to come, Accelerando will help orchestras "begin to look more like their communities." Representing Accelerando for Live in Studio C was 16-year-old violist Emily Martinez-Perez and 17-year-old flutist Aalia Hanif, and audiences can hear a concert from all of the Accelerando students at the Schermerhorn on June 11

Kara McLeland / Nashville Public Radio

After nearly 20 years of welcoming musicians into our studio for weekly performances, Will Griffin hosted his final Live in Studio C this week before retiring. For a proper celebratory send-off, the Tantsova Grupa ensemble performed a lively set of traditional Eastern European dance music. 

Julietta Martinelli / Nashville Public Radio

Few people have ever known the ins and outs of 91Classical’s music library as well as Will Griffin. He’s worked with this music longer than anyone else at the station, and maintaining and adding to the collection was an important part of his job.

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